Recent Program-Supported Publications

The U.S. Department of Energy Isotope Program (DOE IP) supports research and development of novel methods to produce isotopes of national interest or of new or improved technologies that foster enhanced isotope production. The following research manuscripts acknowledge the DOE IP for their funding contributions.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of publications related to the DOE IP. Our list attempts to capture all publications from 2019 and beyond.

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Electron linear accelerator production and purification of scandium-47 from titanium dioxide targets

Abstract: The photonuclear production of no-carrier-added (NCA) 47Sc from solid NatTiO2 and the subsequent chemical processing and purification have been developed. Scandium-47 was produced by the 48Ti(γ,p)47Sc reaction with Bremsstrahlung photons produced from the braking of electrons in a high-Z (W or Ta) convertor. Production yields were simulated with the PHITS code (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport-code System) and compared to experimental results. Irradiated TiO2 targets were dissolved in fuming H2SO4 in the presence of Na2SO4 and 47Sc was purified using the commercially available Eichrom DGA resin. Typical 47Sc recovery yields were >90% with excellent specific activity for small batches (<185 MBq batches).

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Consensus nomenclature rules for radiopharmaceutical chemistry — Setting the record straight

Abstract: Over recent years, within the community of radiopharmaceutical sciences, there has been an increased incidence of incorrect usage of established scientific terms and conventions, and even the emergence of ‘self-invented’ terms. In order to address these concerns, an international Working Group on ‘Nomenclature in Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and related areas’ was established in 2015 to achieve clarification of terms and to generate consensus on the utilisation of a standardised nomenclature pertinent to the field.

Upon open consultation, the following consensus guidelines were agreed, which aim to:

  • Provide a reference source for nomenclature good practice in the radiopharmaceutical sciences.
  • Clarify the use of terms and rules concerning exclusively radiopharmaceutical terminology, i.e. nuclear- and radiochemical terms, symbols and expressions.
  • Address gaps and inconsistencies in existing radiochemistry nomenclature rules.
  • Provide source literature for further harmonisation beyond our immediate peer group (publishers, editors, IUPAC, pharmacopoeias, etc.).